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News Report: Stones River’s Banks Are Swelling with New Members While Tagdu Uses the Media to “Hup- Up!

News Report: Stones River’s Banks Are Swelling with New Members While Tagdu Uses the Media to “Hup- Up!

By James Boehm

From the editor: These days James Boehm wears numerous hats. First of all, he is the secretary of our Tennessee affiliate; next, he is the president of the Stones River Chapter; and finally, he is the president of the Tennessee Association of Guide Dog Users. Here is the James Boehm update.

The writer Arnold H. Glasgow once said, “Make life a mission, not an intermission.” Our NFB chapters and division in Middle Tennessee have been on a “mission” lately! How? By spreading the word about equality, reaching out to visually impaired students, and fighting for the rights of service dog users, to name a few.

Stones River, a predominantly student driven chapter of Murfreesboro, has been on “a mission!” The zeal and active participation by its members has drawn the attention of students and the community in the Murfreesboro area. Stones River is also sporting a new look! Four of its five, newly elected board members have been part of the chapter for less than 6 months! Further, the membership of Stones River has doubled in the past 3 months! How exciting! Our chapter meetings have included NFB trivia with gift card prizes, the establishment of Stones River Facebook and Twitter pages, and the organization of new committees. Various guests have been impressed by our positive atmosphere and welcoming spirit! Stones River will soon become a recognized student organization, which will open doors in building our chapter and make a difference in our community.

Many fundraising and community outreach projects are in the works. The Broad Street Chili’s restaurant in Murfreesboro sponsored a fundraiser on Memorial Day that provided many opportunities to bring awareness of our chapter and educate the community about the NFB. The Chili’s manager and staff expressed sincere appreciation and support from their establishment.

Stones River’s success is not by accident! Exemplary mentors and energetic members drive the growth and unity in Murfreesboro. I would like to thank all of Stones River’s members for their support, leadership, and fine example, modeling what being part of an NFB chapter is all about!

Stone’s River of Murfreesboro is not the only group in Middle Tennessee on a “mission.” In January 2014, The Tennessee Association of Guide Dog Users, or TAGDU, was formed and has flourished to become a strong affiliate of the NFB. As a proud division of The National Association of Guide Dog Users, TAGDU’s 25 members have, as a united front, worked vigorously in order to make a difference in Tennessee! How so?

In March 2014, James Brown and I were featured in a well-written article by the Tennessean about guide dogs and the newly implemented access laws; the article was picked up by other papers nationally, including USA Today, The Commercial Appeal, and other community newspapers. During this same period, TAGDU was contacted by a gentleman named George from Athens, Tennessee. George was distraught by policies established by his county’s school system that discriminated against guide dog users. TAGDU’s public relations director, Katherine Womack, as well as many other members of TAGDU, spent countless hours writing and contacting key individuals within the system, advocating for service dog users. These school officials, DLAC, and the TN School Board Association gave TAGDU the cold-shoulder, and were unwilling to further discuss these policies. Research exposed other school systems in Tennessee with policies that must be updated. Did TAGDU lose its fire due to the lack of support? No! After providing McMinn County, the School Board Association, and Blount County a reasonable time to respond, TAGDU decided action was needed. TAGDU began a vigorous press release that was shared with many media entities. To date, Channel 6 of Knoxville and the Sentinel of Knoxville have exposed the outdated guide dog policies and discrimination as top stories in their broadcasts and newspaper. As a result, both McMinn County and Blount County schools have stated that their policies will be amended in order to comply with state and federal ADA laws. It’s great to see how the persistence of a united, strong division can make! Be sure to check out the links at the end of this writing to see these recently published articles.

What future “missions” await TAGDU? We will continue to access various media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and com

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The Flame of Equality

The Flame of Equality
by James Boehm

The disabled have fought an uphill battle in demanding equality of all. Many blind organizations, such as the National Federation of the Blind, endeavor to educate the public regarding the abilities of the visually impaired, squashing all inaccurate misconceptions that are stereotyped. A thriving front of assistive technology experts are an intricate part in the mix of training and equipping the disabled. In 2014, in a time where we may feel that our world is a modernized society, the views many still have on the disabled gives the world the appearance that we are back in the Stone Age, a reverted thinking of inequality, slavery, poor expectations and the perceived inabilities of the “challenged!” A film entitled “A Little History Worth Knowing” exposes the actions of many nations, including the United States, in not only discriminating, but also attempting to extinguish the disabled, putting them out like a minute flame on a Bic lighter. Powerful persons, such as Hitler, attempted through eugenics, to weed out the supposedly weak or disabled, as a strand of crabgrass who holds such thoughts, thus disabling their own selves cognitively.
Assistive technology experts strive to keep the pace with the advances of assistive technology. Bill Burgess, the director of the Assistive Technology lab at Middle Tennessee University, agrees with president Marc Maurer of the NFB, when he states “effective technology …empower(s) the individual user of that technology. Invaluable assistive tools allow the user to “compete effectively in this world and…(achieve) quality in life,” (Monitor, 2004). I truly respect and appreciate Bill’s expertise and sincere desire to empower his clients to successful endeavors. Assistive technology “connects (the disabled) and levels the playing field.” Burgess expressed that technology will continue to advance, becoming “simpler to use… and more ubiquitous, providing universal access (for everyone),” (personal communication, February 16th, 2014). What progress is being made today in education for the disabled.
A bill that will be introduced this year is called the TEACH Act (Technology, Education, and Accessibility in College and Higher Education). Presently, educational institutions provide materials in an accessible format only when requested. The TEACH Act would require that from the get-go, all materials would be accessible and readily available to all students. James Brown, State President of the Tennessee NFB Affiliate, commented, “It is so important for blind students around Tennessee to have equal access to education,” (personal communication, February 18th, 2014). Legislation such as the TEACH Act paves the way for other states to follow and will benefit students of all disabilities. Yes, a bright future accomplished by the hard work of education and advocacy.
The film “History’s” narrator stated that “in the 1950’s and 60’s, while blacks were trying to get in the front of the bus, the disabled were just trying to get on the bus,” (A Little History). Changing the minds and educating the world has had its challenges. Yet today, many have been educated and have a more accurate understanding of the disabled’s capabilities. There is still more work to do!
True, today there have been numerous attempts to extinguish the flame of advocacy among the disabled. Nevertheless, that fire has not gone out! The raging, scorching fire of equality burning deep inside every disabled person has continued to spread like an uncontained forest fire, moving at the pace of a steam powered train roaring to its destination! This destination is a place called ‘equality.” A destination with a capital named “The metropolis Free of Stereotypes, where all its citizens enjoy fulfilling lives of equality and fulfillment.” Through organizations, such as the NFB, our communities are being educated. Persons such as Bill Burgess train the disabled in the progression of technology and independence. Thus, the disabled, well equipped and educated, have proven that they can compete shoulder to shoulder among “normal” man. Examples have shown that with the proper gaining, education , technology, and the lack of hindrance of stereotypes, the disabled flourish, living successful and meaningful lives. William Butler Yates, a famous author is quoted as saying “education is not the filling of the pail, but the lighting the fire.” So may that flame never die!

The Definition of “Disability”

Martina Navratilova, a well-known poet once said “disability is a matter of perception. How an accurate statement that is! When many hear the word disability, they may think of someone with Down syndrome, a person in a wheelchair, or one who is blind. A person who has limited function physically or mentally is referred to as disabled. Kris Boehm, my father, defines disability as a person who has difficulty with a particular task. My thoughts reflected such a viewpoint as well. Do I continue to have such an perspective?
In 2010, I lost my sight due to an attempted suicide. I only knew of one other blind individual, so I was unaware of what my future held out for me. Would I be able to pursue the same goals and live an active life as before? Would I be able to partake in the same hobbies activities as before? Initially, I thought not. How can a person with no vision live an independant and fruitful life?
My self-determination and positive attitude aided me in seeking out the education and tools that are available to the blind. I came into contact with other fine examples of blind individuals who did not let their lack of vision hinder them from pursuing meaningful and fulfilling lives.Thus, I feel that just because a person may have a limitation, whether it be physical or mental, with the proper training and education, such characteristics that appear to be a disability are no disability at all! For instance, blindness may be preconceived as a limitation, yet being vision impaired can be easily overcome with technology, education, and the right mindset.
A disability is something that limits you from performing a certain task. Hence, if you have the right training and education and you have learned to perform the same tasks you used to, just differently, how is that a disability? Can a person without an obvious impairment be considered disabled? Imagine a six foot six inches tall man trying to fit in a Mini Cooper. Such a tall person may not be able to fit comfortably in such a vehicle or have the ability to drive the coupe. Could he not be considered disabled by circumstance? I believe so. Therefore, if your physical impairment does not limit or hinder you in your daily activities, is it a disability? I believe not.
I have met doctors, chemists, teachers, golfers, Olympians, and business owners that are blind but “see” no limits as to what they set their mind on. I had the pleasure of meeting Mark Rickobono, the first blind man to drive a self-driving car, hitting speeds up to 43 mph in his first drive! Such examples motivate and reaffirm the notion that the only thing that will hinder me is myself.
Do others perceive the disabled as capable individuals? Unfortunately no! Due to ignorance and the inconsistencies from the media, the majority feel that those with disabilities are helpless and inferior. The disabled have advocated for themselves to legislate for equality in today’s world. For instance, in the United States, an outdated law entitled Section 14C of the Fair Labor Standards Act, discriminates against those who are disabled; the 1938 act allows companies to apply for certificates in order to pay disabled individuals pennies on the dollar, far lower than the minimum wage. In fact, businesses such as Goodwill pay their disabled employees as low as 12 cents an hour- and it’s legal! These same employers have multi-million dollar owners and managers that exploit the provisions of the Fair Wages Act. They even receive tax deductions, government cutbacks, and other incentives that find their way into their own pockets. Organizations, such as the National Federation of the Blind and the American Foundation of the Blind, are working hard to legislate and repeal these unjust standards.
Often, parents and families of disabled children, due to being unaware of the availability of training and sources within hands reach, shelter their child so much that the child feels as if someone has to do everything for them. Such a person’s communication and interaction skills with others suffer due to their sheltered environment. This presents a challenge, but not a challenge that cannot be overcome with the proper training and education.
How does language influence how we view people with disabilities? The misconceptions and attitudes towards the abilities of disabled persons reflect onto the vocabulary and expressions used today. We may subconsciously discriminate against one with a perceived disability. Thus, such language transfers to the conscious mind, affecting our interpretations and opinions. The inaccurate belief that the disabled are not capable of overcoming their ailment highlights the need for further education and advocacy.
So are all ideas of disabilities accurate? No! Even though we live in 2014, much more effort and work is needed to educate the world about disabilities. Organizations, such as the National Federation of the Blind and the American Council of the Blind, lead the front to change what it means to be blind in the eyes of those blinded by false assumptions. Many blind have more vision than a sighted individual; numerous paralyzed persons in wheelchairs have walked through trials and tribulations triumphantly to live happy and satisfying lives! Technology has aided many to accomplish tasks that the everyday person would think be impossible. We disable ourselves only if we limit ourselves in our thinking! I asked my father, since having a son who recently lost his vision, has his thoughts on disabilities changed? He replied, “Yes… At first I thought we would become caretakers…but my viewpoint now is that perhaps the disability for many is their perception of how a person can adapt in order to be a whole person. Given the right opportunity and motivation we all can overcome anything others perceive as a disability… My son has proven that to me.”
So, what are your perceptions in referring to the disabled? Never be “handicapped” by preconceived notions!

My article: A Blind Eye to Equality

Turning a Blind Eye to Inequality
Written by James Boehm
Your boss just handed you a check for a weeks worth of work. The payment reflects a week worth of work consisting of an eight to five time frame. As you glance down at the the piece of paper, looking at the total amount, you notice a minute total of $1.35. You rub your eyes to ensure that your vision is not playing tricks on you. As you verify with the calendar to your left, you verify that, yes, it is the year 2013, not 1803. How is this possible? Can such a form of recompense for services rendered be justified legally?
Now consider this: You have just become a proud parent of a beautiful baby girl! The newborn portrays a perfect balance of her parent’s features. What a proud moment in a new parent’s life! You hold your new addition to your family and observe this little one, who at first sight of his new parents, presents a smile of contentment. Soon, the nurses proceed to take the child from the delivery room and prepare the child for the nursery. You did not know as the physicians file out of the room, this will be the last time you would see your child for quite some time. In fact, later on you are notified that you are not perceived to be a capable parent, and thus the child has been put in the care of a stranger rather than you. What an indescribable feeling that words of pain and sorrow cannot even begin to portray!
No one would think, especially now in our advanced and civilized society, would such circumstances occur. Yet such occurrences are experienced by individuals with visual impairments so frequently it terrifies even the most courageous. Blindness should not be a factor in determining if a person is capable of raising a child. Such issues arise due to the misconceptions of abilities of the blind. When considering the qualifications for employment or parenthood, blindness should not be a determining factor.
There have been many advances in education and laws that uphold the unalienable rights of the blind and disabled. It was not until the second half of the twentieth century that attention was brought to the protection of rights of the blind in various aspects. In 1990, the statutes of the ADA, the Americans with Disabilities Act, outlined numerous regulations on healthcare, accessibility in transit, public education, housing, and labor, to name a few. While there have been many strides towards equality, the common discrimination brings to light the need to educate the public that there is still a lot of work to do. Many organizations, including the NFB, National Federation of the Blind,The American Council for the Blind (ACB), and The American Foundation of the Blind (AFB), actively take part in education, training, and legislation for the visually impaired. Likewise, these organizations educate the public on the misconceptions of blindness. History and numerous examples have shown that people who are blind, with the proper training, education, and tools, can competitively work along side the sighted public.
The blind have the right to receive fair and competitive wages in their employment. Sub-minimum wages are being paid to blind and disabled persons in the work force. According to the Braille Monitor, a 78 year old provision called the Fair Labor Standards Act, permits United States companies to receive certificates from the government when the company has hired a blind or disabled person (Danielson). With such a certificate, a person can be paid sub-minimum wages. Companies like Goodwill advertise and boast about their hiring of disabled workers. Nevertheless, these same companies have been documented as paying absurdly low hourly rates. “…Goodwill affiliates operate manufacturing operations that employ people with disabilities under special wage certificates at wages as low as 22 cents per hour…” (Danielson). Organizations, such as the National Federation of the Blind, and American Council of the Blind, protest against and boycott such companies, exposing the companies’ inequitable standards. In the aforementioned article, director of public relations for the National Federation of the Blind, states, “Don’t donate to or purchase goods from Goodwill until it adopts a responsible corporate policy to pay its works with disabilities at least the federal minimum wage Current legislation is in the works to amend the ADA so companies will no longer take advantage of the laws that actually were set forth to protect the disabled. The discriminating employers argue that changes to current legislation would create a financial hardship , causing them to either to shut down or terminate employees. Such idiotic reasoning is attempting to frame the employers as victims. How can employers consider themselves victims when the revenue they collect is beyond the income derived from the actual productivity of the worker who is disabled? Such companies that give the perception that they are helping the disabled community receive tax benefits, public funding, donations, preferred contracts before one of their employees even step foot into the factory. In contrast, such justification exposes the perverse exploitation the existing provisions authorized by the Fair Wages Act.
Now, another misconception that negatively affects the blind community is in parenting. Blindness should not be a determining factor in establishing if a person is capable of raising a child. According to The Huffington Post, in 2012, parents with disabilities “continue to be the only distinct community has to fight to retain and sometimes gain custody of their own children” (Crary). A Time Magazine article entitled “Rocking the Cradle- Ensuring the Rights of Parents,” notes that parents with disabilities face discrimination when the welfare of a child or family law, becomes an issue as well as adoption (Rochman). In 1990, The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed by Congress, implemented to protect parents with disabilities. Yet, the ADA at times has fallen short, pushing visually impaired parents into legal quicksand. Two thirds of state child welfare law list some type of disability as grounds for removing a child from the confines of a parents care and terminating the parental rights.
In a March 2010 ABC news report, a young blind family had just given birth to a lovely baby boy, but were dumb founded to find out that they could no longer have their child, could not hold the newborn, and would have to agree to supervised visits in order to see their son throughout the week (James). The NFB eagerly and rightfully brought suit against the hospital and child welfare services. The federation was successful in the legal battle, bringing an end to the discriminatory misconceptions expressed towards the capable, blind young family. One of the parents, Erika Johnson, stated after the ordeal, “We’re visually impaired, not mentally impaired. And you know we’re just like everybody else, we just can’t see as well. (James)
Luci Alexander, a blind parent of two children under the age of 10, and the director for blind services in New Mexico, stated in March of 2013 that “blind parents perform the same duties of caring for a child.” Blind parents can execute necessary tasks for their children auditory just as well as those who do those same activities visually. A visually impaired parent can tell by sound distinctions if a child has a baby bottle in their hand or toy, to see if the child has acquired an item it should not have. Likewise, no matter if a parent is sighted or not, a child can pick up things off the floor or get into mischief. The point is the parent has to be observant and mindful of the child’s behavior. Disability rights lawyer Robyn Powell comments on this in the Huffington Post article previously mentioned saying, “Of course there are going to be some parents with disabilities who would be lousy parents – that’s the same with parents without disabilities” (Crary). Obviously, orderliness, preparation, and a conscientious effort to have a safe home environment is necessary, and all of this can be done quite effectively by the unsighted.
In conclusion, today’s misconceptions of blindness cause inequalities in regards to fair wages and employment and the rights of parents. Those who place stereotypes are blinder than the blind themselves. The misconception is if you do not have sight, you do not have the capacity. What people fail to realize is that blind people develop alternate ways of performing day-to-day tasks. Thus, the blind have demonstrated effectiveness and the ability to be beneficiaries of fair wages, employment, as well as not allowing their blindness be a determining factor of if they are a capable parent. Blindness misconceptions must be addressed further because the blind community is growing. According to Tina Lubarsky, an advocate for the ACB and a physical therapist, “Diabetic rhetanopothy is the leading cause for blindness today, affecting thirty percent of people with diabetes.” In an article “Don’t Blame the Eater, , David Zinzinko stated, “by 2050, one in three adults will suffer form type two diabetes.” If such trends continue, this means that one ninth of the population will suffer from diabetic retanopothy or some form of blindness. Urgency is needed to educate the public regarding the many misconceptions of blindness, and that further legislation is needed to protect and uphold the equality of all persons regardless of gender, disability, race, etc. Likewise, blindness should not be a factor when determining employment, fair wages, or distinguishing the capability of a potential parent. The exploitation of the disabled as a resource for charity revenue and fundraising must come to an end! Next time you get your paycheck, remember that the visually impaired are just as capable and deserve the same treatment in all of life’s aspects including in employment and parenthood.

James’ Top Five I phone Accessible Apps as of August 2013

James’s Top App Picks
As you open the assisted living magazines pages of the numerous devices that are available for the blind to continue in an independant lifestyle, it is invigorating. If you purchased every device to aid you in your daily life activities-like a money identifier, and color reeno- GPS trecker, OCR scanner and recognition software,Calendar,timers, note recorders,bar code scanners,- to name a few, you would be spending thousands upon thousands and would thus need to invest in a large suitcase on wheels or borrow the local grocery stores shopping cart to transport all the devices with you. Further, you will be spending so much money on these items, that once you have acquired these things, you Won’t have the money to use them because you are broke. How nice Apple has provided us with an alternate solution: one device-that handles all those individual devices, and many times in a superior fashion. So, you begin to comprehend how much time and space you will save without having to haul that Piggly Wiggly shopping cart around.Thus, When you tally all the amounts of the prices of those individual devices,and them compare it to the iPhone and of the many things that is already built into its operating system,as well as purchasing the apps that specifcifically pertain to your needs.The variations of price between the two situations are astronomical.The I phone is todays SwiSS Army Knife. A knife that isconpact,has just what you need, and works well with a purpose.
Here are my top apps. I based this on which apps I use the most, accessibility, ease of use, and reliability. I likewise attempted to pick apps of various purpose.
1. Look Tell Money Reader
Instantly recognizes currenciesand speaks denomination with use of the camera. Works fast and with little effort. 21 currencies supported.LookTel Money Reader provides Voice Over support for several languages including English, Spanish, French, Italian, German, Polish, Portugese, Russian, Korean, Finnish, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Japanese, Greek, Hungarian, and Mandarin.
2. Tap Tap See
TapTapSee is a free app that helps the blind and visually impaired become more independent in their day-to-day activities.
Identify any object around

Ability to identify US paper currency

Can determine images, colors, and limited text transcriptions. Automatic flash
Auto-focus sound
3. Blind Square

Top 5 Apps
Blind Square
I have found this to be the best GPS app due to its ease of use and layout. No need to hunt and peck for buttons to get your location or direction. Just shake your phone. Blind Square will give the your current address, the nearest intersection, it’s distance, and uses the clock direction to tell you where things are according to where you are facing. I use this to explore new areas with confidence.
4. In Class
A very helpful app for note taking. Best app I have found to organize your notes according to subject or class. In Class will determine which class you are in and will automatically pull up a note for that particular class. Besides text, add audio, video, Photos, and files to your notes if you wish. Share your notes via Facebook, email, messaging. Easily set reminders for assignments and projects. This app has many features to aid you in being organized and efficient.
5. Text Grabber
I am amazed by the capabilities of this app. Last semester I was able to read my fellow classmates’ papers in a in-class workshop using Text Grabber. Take a picture of a document and let Text Grabber do the rest. Further, the app will translate the scanned text into other languages.Or consider this: You have a document in a different language. Take a photo with Text Grabber and the app will translate the text into whatever language you want and read it to you. Edit the text, share via email, mss, or send toyour Evernote account.
Honorable Mentions:
These apps deserve mentioning 🙂
-I Blink Radio
Bookoos of information on technology, legislation, news,resources,entertainment, blogs, podcast,support groups, and so much more.
-i iVzWiz
A personal visual assistant. Unlike Tap Tap See or other apps like OMB, which use visual recognition software,iVzWiz sends your photo and a short audio recording of your liking to actual webworkers, or your social media to get information.
-NFB Newsline
Get access to local and national newspapers. Read the latest Times, National Geographic, and numerous other magazines or periodicals. Notifies you or current weather conditions and alerts. Many features.
-Smart Recorder
Another app for note taking. Record audio and sync with all of your devices.Easy interface with one of the best audio recording quality I have found.
-Mail Shot Group
Organize your contacts and create groups with ease.
-Focus
For all you Facebook lovers-another way to access your Facebook. A simplified and more consistant interface.
I hope these apps will aid you in your independance,confidence, and day to day travels. New apps come out every day and current app get updates or new features. I strive to keep up with the latest new developments of accessible technology and applications. If you or someone you know would like to receive emails on my latest findings,feel free to share my email with them: jimmydagerman80@gmail.com. The only consistant thing in this world is change. The evolution of technology and accessibility is ever advancing. Working together, we will evolve ourselves into successful contributors of society.

I phone Home Button Issues

Has your Home button ever seemed like it was unresponsive or lagged behind? Or even worse- did your home button seem to play dead like an armadillo on a summer road? No worries! You have some options. Try this first:
After just a ffew easy steps, you can recalibrate your home button:
Step 1: Navigate to, and launch one of the stock applications on your iPhone. If you don’t already know, the stock apps are things like weather, YouTube, stocks, settings etc (any that come as part of iOS).
Step 2: When the app is launched, press and hold the Power button located at the top of the device until the ‘Slide to power off’ appears.
Step 3: Press and hold the iPhone home button. Keep the button depressed until the Slide to power off slider disappears and the application quits back to Springboard.
Step 4: Voila! Your home button is now re-calibrated and should be more responsive for you.
Now, what if your home button has kicked The Bucket, with no hope for resurrection? Check out another alternative, for all is not lost:
“Is your iPhone’s home button busted? Do you have to press it down as hard as you can ten times in a row before it actually takes you to the home screen? Are you contemplating buying a new phone because you just can’t stand it any longer? Don’t do that! There’s a simple fix for your problem, and it won’t cost you a dime.
I’m going to let you in on the secret: AssistiveTouch. This is most assuredly the good kind of touch — one that will gently wake you from your home button nightmare.
Before I get into how it works, here’s how to turn it on:
Open up Settings
Tap on General
Scroll down and tap Accessibility
Scroll down almost to the bottom, tap on AssistiveTouch, and switch the button to ON

Once you complete these steps, a small, semi-transparent button will appear on your screen — think of it as the closest Apple will ever get to a widget. And it won’t just appear on your settings screen, it will appear on every screen. You see, this is the button that’s going to take you back home.
You can drag the AssistiveTouch button wherever you please on the left or right-hand side of your screen, but it never disappears, so put it somewhere out of the way. When you touch it, a small menu pops up over whatever screen you’re on, with options for Favorites, Voice Control, Device, and, yes, Home.
Tapping on Home will make the pop-up menu disappear and bring you right back to your home screen, just like your physical home button did. It works like your physical home button in every other way as well. For instance, if you tap on it twice it will activate your phone’s multitasking capabilities.

You’re probably wondering why Apple even snuck this feature in there in the first place. It’s almost like your home button was destined to break all along, right? Actually, AssistiveTouch was designed for people who can’t hit the physical home button properly. Apple understands that it’s important to make modern devices accessible to as many people as possible. It’s just a happy coincidence that it’s also a cheap fix for your broken home button.
And while it may seem a little obtrusive at first, you start to forget the AssistiveTouch button is even there after a while. Give it some time, and you’ll find yourself wondering why it wasn’t there all along, and what’s so good about physical buttons anyway?
Once you’ve sworn off your old home button for good, you may even start to notice there’s a lot of other cool stuff you can do with AssistiveTouch. Want to take a screenshot? Go for it. Turn the volume up or down? You can do that too. In fact, the AssistiveTouch button makes it so that you never have to press another physical button again… Except your power button. If that one goes, and you’ve got a got a busted home button, get yourself to the Genius Bar, and fast.”
One phrase of wisdom I always try to keep in mind is “When all else fails, Reboot! Nine times out of ten, a simple reboot or powering off and on the phone will whip your phone back into shape like Richard Simmons on Sparks.

There are a couple different ways to reboot. How are these two reboots done and which reboot is appropriate for the specific issue that you are having?Stay tuned for a future blog! 🙂

Introduction-Greetings! and Article on Stereotypes

I hope you find this blog useful 🙂 We will address new apps that are /aren’t accessible and useful…stereotypes, ADA laws, fair wages, mobility travel, education,assistive technology, braille related topics, guide dog issues, and much more. I wanted to start by sharing an article I wrote recently that was published in a magazine. Enjoy!
Clear Your Vision: Lose the Stereotypes
What did the blonde say when she opened a box of cheerios? “Oh, look! Doughnut seeds!” The above mentioned comment is an example of a stereotype, an attribute given to a particular group of persons. In this instance all blondes are portrayed as air heads Other examples include Asians being good at math, Jews being cheap, African-Americans liking fried chicken and watermelon, men being insensitive, and women being prone to gossip. Stereotype comes from the Greek word “steros,” meaning firm and solid, and “typos,” meaning impression. Are such solid impressions accurate? Obviously, the bias and prejudice of stereotyping is not reliable. For example, some people think that people who are deaf can not communicate effectively with the rest society, and that people with artificial limbs cannot participate in competitive sports. Anoter perception to consider is that the visually impaired are not as capable of being successful as the sighted community. Such an inaccurate thought, as well as the above mentioned stereotypes, exist due to an opinionated misconception, people’s ignorance or lack of education.
An underlying thought of some is that the blind in general are helpless, needing their hand held like a small child, because of inadequacies and incapabilities. A visually impaired friend from Indiana expresses,that “The public consciousness as demonstrated through literature and artwork through the ages depicts the blind as poor, beggars, dirty, and dehumanized individuals. The collective social perception may arise because this may allow us to disconnect compassion and remove any feeling of guilt with respect to the individual or their situation that we may not be able to fix or change.” Yet another friend of mine, Karen Nelson, a mobility and orientation instructor for the Middle Tennessee area, reminded me of an instance not long after loosing my vision.My father and I were in the waiting area at the doctor’s office. A gentleman was sitting across from us facing our direction. The man apparently noticed me, but instead of directing his words at me, he proceeded to ask my father, “So is your son blind?” I wanted to say “Yeah, and deaf too.” I wondered why the man did not address me. Karen aided me in comprehending the man’s actions by expressing that “People often think persons who are blind are unable to do for themselves. What I see that [the] public doesn’t approach persons who are blind because they don’t know what to do or say. There are not the visual cues indicating it is okay. But someone like you who opens the door verbally when near people helps them know that they are welcome to interact with you.” In a sense, it’s understandable because I myself had not met many blind people before my vision loss.Therefore, I grasp the uncertainty of interacting with blind individuals.
When it comes to the work place, can the blind provide comparable or even exceed expectations? The visually impaired have proven through many examples that lack of vision is not a issue when it comes to job performance when provided with the appropriate training and technology if needed. Today, numerous blind personalities carry out their own law firms, doctor’s practices, or are professional athletes such the blind golfer Jeremy Poincenot. However, some employers feel, due to the fact that they do not have the sense of vision, they are inferior, and thus they are not qualified to receive competitive pay. In fact, according to current federal laws, an employer can attain a certificate on a disabled individual mandating a wage less than minimum wage. This is justifiable by law. Reports have come to the forefront regarding certain employers, such as Goodwill, paying their disabled employees as little as one dollar or less an hour! Many advocacy organizations, including the American Federation for the Blind and the National Federation for the Blind, are working with legislation as we speak to ratify and provide equal opportunity to all United States citizens, even if they are disabled. A person’s disability should not be exploited by multi-million dollar companies who misuse outdated regulations. To abuse the hard work of their employees, pocketing the deserved wages and government incentives for themselves.
I personally know of many fine examples of blind individuals who have such an outstanding determination to vigorously pursue their goals and be an active, productive citizen. The examples I have in mind control their circumstances, and don’t let their circumstances control them. Jessica Beecham, a dear friend of mine, has been blind most of her life. Jessica’s eye disease has continued to worsen her limited peripheral vision. Has Jessica allowed her” lack of vision” to give her a “lack of vision?” Quite the opposite! I have never met someone with such zeal and devotion to helping others, advocating rights of people with all disabilities, working with troubled children, and assisting students at a university so that they may get the most of their higher learning experience through education and assistive technology. Jessica was one of the first blind individuals I met when I had first lost my vision. At the time, I was uncertain of my future, as well as what I was capable of doing with my life. Jessica’s vast knowledge was immediately perceived in speaking with her. Her big heart, and sincere eagerness to assist, moved me more than words can say. Jessica reminds me of “The Energizer Bunny”, always on the go, traveling and participating in a vast array of adventuresome activities that most sighted people have not even attempted to pursue or even had the opportunity for that matter. One instance, of Jessica’s “always on the go” mentality happened this past summer I called Jessica to see what she plans she had for that day. Jess replied, “Oh, just about to do a little sky diving.” She could not be more audacious with such a statement. I am aware I still have a lot to learn, but I owe much thanks for her example, assistance when I needed her viewpoint, and her friendship.
I have certainly been guilty of stereotyping groups of people, even intentionally at times. Human tendency is to prejudge. Everyone who is honest with himself or herself will be humble enough to admit they live up, or better said, live down, to such conduct. However, knowledge is power. Occasionally, interaction with the blind, widening out, making an effort to get to know such ones,can give a person a different perspective. Says one father of a recently blinded son, “My contact with the visually impaired while I was growing up was limited to television and musicians, such as Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, and Ronnie Milsap. In the 1990’s I volunteered at the Guiding Hands for the Blind and worked at a radio station where for several years we read local newspapers to around three hundred local visually impaired individuals. I received feedback from such ones from the blind community who enjoyed my reading, but never had the privilege of meeting a fan face-to-face. As a parent, I had no idea what to do when my son lost his sight. I found through research a tremendous amount of support groups, organizations, and facilities that help parents understand the impact in their life and when an accident that leaves a young one blind and most important, how to get help. When I am with my son attending meetings and sporting events, and getting to know those involved, it is clear that many with visual impairment are very capable in organizational management and pursuing higher education and competitive athletics, with the goal in mind of helping others experiencing the same challenges…. A person who loses his sight or has never had sight can learn to do almost anything anyone else can do. I have witnessed it firsthand.”
So, the blind are as incapable and dependent on others, as every blonde when opening a box of Cheerios says, “Look! Doughnut seeds!” Stereotypes are often found unreliable and inaccurate. Never let stereotypes of any individual, color, race, or ethnicity give you a false perspective of one’s capabilities, characteristics, or demeanor. The same courtesy should be extended to those disabled, and more specifically, visually impaired. Many blind people have pursued productive careers that many sighted people only dream about having– like the attorney, Richard h.Bernstein from Michigan. Such fine examples have altered the vistas of certain opinionated people and have shown that blindness is not a disability, but a mere issue that becomes a non issue with the proper training , education, and assistive technology.Various governments as well are discerning the true abilities of the disabled and are amending legislation that reflects such truth. The blind do not possess super human capability. Once at Kroger, I approached the counter to pay for my goods. The cashier skipped the whole introduction formality and says, “Hey, so, do you have super duper hearing?”
I kind of laugh to myself, then reply, “Well, I do pay more attention to my hearing as well as other senses to navigate or do other things.”
The cashier then replies back by saying, “Well, I just saw the movie Daredevil , and he (the blind character) had super duper hearing. So, umm, tell me what else can you do?”
I had to hold myself from saying, “Leap tall buildings with a single bound and catch a bullet with my teeth!””
Another cashier Behind me finally said to the young man, “ Shut up and quit asking him stupid questions.”
Hence, are “solid impressions” always as solid as commonly thought? No! The point is the blind are just like everyone else. The blind are not super-humans with “super-duper” sensory abilities; they merely accomplish the same tasks, just in a different manner. Yes! Clear your vision– lose the stereotypes! Never underestimate the underestimated.